crookedteethcomics

crookedteethcomics:

bitchinville:

BITCHINVILLE CINEMA AND THE GENIUS OF NATE DOYLE, PART 2: After Bitchinville Cinema’s initial run, we had a short series of screenings the next year in the Tiki Tent at Roberta’s. No more backyard punk screenings — they were getting big and were renovating it to be nicer. Bah. Anyway, this time around we were doing all-VHS double-features. It was fun, and I love the visual idea of the Riverbottom Nightmare Band playing some sort of wild warehouse show in Brooklyn, and if you think about it one way, the Last Starfighter/Buckaroo Banzai poster could be happening AT that show. Once again, Nate Doyle (follow him at Crooked Teeth Comics) rules.

The other three…

crookedteethcomics

crookedteethcomics:

bitchinville:

BITCHINVILLE CINEMA AND THE GENIUS OF NATE DOYLE: Beginning in the summer of 2011 and continuing until October of that year, I ran a movie night called Bitchinville Cinema in the backyard of Roberta’s in Bushwick. It was a rough and fun affair where we’d set up seats and tables, a screen, projector and sound system, and have their mobile pizza oven set up to fire up a small menu of pizza as well as coolers full of drinks and such. Sometimes people came, sometimes they didn’t, but the most consistent element of the whole short-lived experiment were the posters, which were illustrated by my pal Nate Doyle (the man behind Crooked Teeth Comics), who would take my “art direction” (the copy, a vague idea, some reference and a request to think about Raymond Pettibon) and come up with something amazing on short notice. I’d take the jpegs he sent, zip on down to the copy shop to make a few 2’x3’ posters to hang up and give away, and we’d move on to the next week. It’s one of the things I’ve done that I’m the proudest of and it wouldn’t have been half as good without Nate and I’m proud to say we’re working on stuff together to this day.

My friend Gabe posted this collection of fliers we did together, some are better than others and I was attempting to work in a style that was a little different. Things look kind of wonky and some were more rushed. I like little bits of each and probably would change a lot if I did them now hahaha.

edpiskor

thecomicsvault:

I often get asked “why do you post so much hip hop music on this blog?” and “what’s the connection between comics and hip hop culture?”. To which I answer: “BECAUSE.” and “BASICALLY EVERYTHING!”.

From their underground beginnings, to their acceptance in mainstream culture. From the similarities between over the top characters, the super groups, the feuds, the team-ups and their ability to advance their art form and re-invent themselves and their medium over the years.

Hip Hop and comic books will always be linked, and my love for both is the main inspiration for this blog.

Above is selections from
Ed Piskor’s HIP HOP FAMILY TREE TWO-IN-ONE
from this past Free Comics Day. It illustrates better than I could how closely linked the two mediums are. 

"I pass with a nod and a reminisce. I swear to god, Hip Hop and Comic Books is my genesis."

daily-dune
daily-dune:

glharvey:

Dune Messiah
In the sequel to Frank Herbert’s Dune, 12 Years have passed since Paul Atreidis seized the throne as Emperor.  While he struggles with his prescient visions, others are conspiring in the shadows.

Check out more of Glenn Harvey’s amazing work here:http://glharvey.tumblr.com/

daily-dune:

glharvey:

Dune Messiah

In the sequel to Frank Herbert’s Dune, 12 Years have passed since Paul Atreidis seized the throne as Emperor.  While he struggles with his prescient visions, others are conspiring in the shadows.

Check out more of Glenn Harvey’s amazing work here:
http://glharvey.tumblr.com/